Health >> Safety
Scientific studies have shown that children handle aspartame the same way as adults.
A task force of the American Academy of Pediatrics' Committee on Nutrition concluded that aspartame is safe for both the pregnant mother and developing baby.
A number of scientific studies done by experts at several well-known academic centers, including the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the National Institute of Mental Health, Harvard Medical School, and Yale Medical School...
The overwhelming body of scientific evidence clearly demonstrates that aspartame, even in amounts many times what people typically consume, is safe and not associated with adverse health effects.
The overwhelming body of scientific evidence clearly demonstrates that aspartame, even in amounts many times what people typically consume, is safe and not associated with adverse health effects, including allergic reactions.
Long-term and lifetime tests in rats and mice with extremely large amounts of aspartame showed no evidence of brain tumors or any kind of cancer associated with aspartame.
The overwhelming body of scientific evidence clearly demonstrates that aspartame, even in amounts many times what people typically consume, is safe and not associated with adverse health effects, including headaches.
When determining how much of an ingredient is safe to consume, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) uses the concept of an Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI).
For specific information regarding individual products, the manufacturer should be contacted, as exact formulations differ with each manufacturer.
Sometimes interpreting health reports can be very confusing. The following article can help you to evaluate the health information you read and form an educated opinion on its content.
The NutraSweet Company's brand of aspartame has met all the "kashruth" requirements for year-round use and has been certified as kosher by the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations.
The Epilepsy Institute, an organization devoted to people suffering from seizure-related problems, has concluded that aspartame is not related to seizures among epileptic patients.
Aspartame's safety has been documented in more than 200 objective scientific studies. The safety of aspartame has been confirmed by the regulatory authorities of more than 100 countries.
Allegations by a few individuals that aspartame may be associated with a myriad of ailments are not based on science and have come to be known as "urban myths."
The credibility of health information varies widely, making it tough to know what to believe and what to discard. To sort the jewels from the junk, screen health information against the 10 Red Flags of Junk Science.
Upon digestion, aspartame breaks down into its components - the amino acids, aspartic acid and phenylalanine, and methanol - which are then absorbed and used in the body.
Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a rare inherited disease that prevents the essential amino acid phenylalanine, one of the components of aspartame, from being properly handled by the body.
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